Tools for Practice

Recent Tools for Practice

Tools for Practice #247 – Fact or Fad: Intermittent fasting for sustained weight loss

Does intermittent fasting result in greater sustained (>6 month) weight loss than continuous dieting in adults?

Bottom Line: Although inconsistently defined, intermittent fasting (example 500 kcal/day for 2 days/week) and continuous dieting (~25% reduction in caloric intake daily) result in similar weight loss, usually ~5-9kg at 6 months-1 year. Discontinuation rates with both diets is up to ~60%. Read More

Tools for Practice #246 – Just wait a minute: Point-of-care testing for Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis

In patients with sore throat, how accurate are point-of-care tests in the diagnosis of Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis?

Bottom Line: Point-of-care testing, including rapid antigen detection tests and newer nucleic acid detection tests for GABHS pharyngitis are useful for ruling in a diagnosis of GABHS when positive (specificity 95%-99%). Nucleic acid detection tests may be more sensitive than rapid antigen detection tests (92% versus 85%). While immediate testing and treatment may not always be required, populations at increased risk of GABHS complications, such as Canada’s Indigenous populations, are more likely to benefit. Read More

Tools for Practice #245 – Taking a hard look at the evidence: Phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors in erectile dysfunction

What is the efficacy and safety of phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors (PDE5 inhibitors) for erectile dysfunction?

Bottom Line: PDE5 inhibitors increase the proportion of successful sexual intercourse attempts to ~65% versus ~30% for placebo. For every 3 men given a PDE5 inhibitor compared to placebo, an additional 1 will have “improved erections”. Read More

Tools for Practice #244 – Injecting Evidence into Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections

How effective is platelet-rich plasma for treating Achilles tendinopathy, lateral epicondylitis, and rotator cuff tendinopathy?

Bottom Line: The best quality evidence shows no difference in pain, function, or return to sport between platelet-rich plasma, dry needling, or saline for patients with Achilles tendinopathy, lateral epicondylitis, or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Read More

Tools for Practice #243 – Spread the Word: Widespread Distribution of Naloxone to Decrease Opioid-Related Deaths

Does population-based or programmatic provision of naloxone kits decrease the risk of opioid-related deaths in people who use opioids?

Bottom Line: Offering naloxone kits and overdose related education for people who use opioids and their community may decrease opioid related deaths by ~7 per 100,000 population over one year. Effectiveness is likely influenced by magnitude of opioid problem in a given community and other confounders (like co-ingestions, co-morbidities, type and dose of opioid used). Read More

PEER Picks

#238 – In COPD puffers, does three-of-kind beat a pair?

In Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients on Long-Acting Muscarinic Antagonist (LAMA) and Long-Acting Beta-Agonist (LABA) dual therapy, does adding inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) improve outcomes?

Read More

#237 – Verifying the Value of Vaginal Estradiol Tablets

Are vaginal estradiol tablets (Vagifem®) effective for genitourinary syndrome of menopause?

Read More

#236 – It’s all in the details… or is it? Biosimilars versus biologics for inflammatory conditions

How do biosimilar medications compare to their corresponding originator biologic medications in treating patients with conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease?

Read More

Tools for Practice by Catagory

Anesthesiology

(3)

#244 – Injecting Evidence into Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections

Bottom Line: The best quality evidence shows no difference in pain, function, or return to sport between platelet-rich plasma, dry needling, or saline for patients with Achilles tendinopathy, lateral epicondylitis, or rotator cuff tendinopathy.

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#243 – Spread the Word: Widespread Distribution of Naloxone to Decrease Opioid-Related Deaths

Bottom Line: Offering naloxone kits and overdose related education for people who use opioids and their community may decrease opioid related deaths by ~7 per 100,000 population over one year. Effectiveness is likely influenced by magnitude of opioid problem in a given community and other confounders (like co-ingestions, co-morbidities, type and dose of opioid used).

Read Tool

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

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Cardiology

(3)

#247 – Fact or Fad: Intermittent fasting for sustained weight loss

Bottom Line: Although inconsistently defined, intermittent fasting (example 500 kcal/day for 2 days/week) and continuous dieting (~25% reduction in caloric intake daily) result in similar weight loss, usually ~5-9kg at 6 months-1 year. Discontinuation rates with both diets is up to ~60%.

Read Tool

#245 – Taking a hard look at the evidence: Phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors in erectile dysfunction

Bottom Line: PDE5 inhibitors increase the proportion of successful sexual intercourse attempts to ~65% versus ~30% for placebo. For every 3 men given a PDE5 inhibitor compared to placebo, an additional 1 will have “improved erections”.

Read Tool

#239 – Need milk? Domperidone for increasing breast milk supply

Bottom Line: In mothers of pre-term infants, domperidone increases milk volume by ~90 ml more than placebo after 14 days, with an additional 1 in 5 women experiencing a 50% increase in milk supply. Doses above 30 mg/day are likely not needed and may increase the risk of arrhythmias. Optimal length of treatment unknown.

Read Tool
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Chronic Pain

(3)

#244 – Injecting Evidence into Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections

Bottom Line: The best quality evidence shows no difference in pain, function, or return to sport between platelet-rich plasma, dry needling, or saline for patients with Achilles tendinopathy, lateral epicondylitis, or rotator cuff tendinopathy.

Read Tool

#243 – Spread the Word: Widespread Distribution of Naloxone to Decrease Opioid-Related Deaths

Bottom Line: Offering naloxone kits and overdose related education for people who use opioids and their community may decrease opioid related deaths by ~7 per 100,000 population over one year. Effectiveness is likely influenced by magnitude of opioid problem in a given community and other confounders (like co-ingestions, co-morbidities, type and dose of opioid used).

Read Tool

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool
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Dermatology

(2)

#242 – Putting the FUN in Fungi: Toenail onychomycosis treatments

Bottom Line: Up to 45-60% of patients on oral treatments (terbinafine best), 6-23% on topicals (efinaconazole best), and <10% on placebo will be “cured” after ~1 year. Topicals should be reserved for cases with minimal (≤20-40%) nail involvement.

Read Tool

#241 – “Who’s the fairest of them all?”: Topical treatments for rosacea

Bottom Line: For moderate-severe papulopustular rosacea, topical metronidazole, azelaic acid, and ivermectin have similar benefit with ~65-75% achieving patient reported improvement

Read Tool
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Emergency

(3)

#246 – Just wait a minute: Point-of-care testing for Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis

Bottom Line: Point-of-care testing, including rapid antigen detection tests and newer nucleic acid detection tests for GABHS pharyngitis are useful for ruling in a diagnosis of GABHS when positive (specificity 95%-99%). Nucleic acid detection tests may be more sensitive than rapid antigen detection tests (92% versus 85%). While immediate testing and treatment may not always be required, populations at increased risk of GABHS complications, such as Canada’s Indigenous populations, are more likely to benefit.

Read Tool

#243 – Spread the Word: Widespread Distribution of Naloxone to Decrease Opioid-Related Deaths

Bottom Line: Offering naloxone kits and overdose related education for people who use opioids and their community may decrease opioid related deaths by ~7 per 100,000 population over one year. Effectiveness is likely influenced by magnitude of opioid problem in a given community and other confounders (like co-ingestions, co-morbidities, type and dose of opioid used).

Read Tool

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool
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Endocrinology

(3)

#247 – Fact or Fad: Intermittent fasting for sustained weight loss

Bottom Line: Although inconsistently defined, intermittent fasting (example 500 kcal/day for 2 days/week) and continuous dieting (~25% reduction in caloric intake daily) result in similar weight loss, usually ~5-9kg at 6 months-1 year. Discontinuation rates with both diets is up to ~60%.

Read Tool

#245 – Taking a hard look at the evidence: Phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors in erectile dysfunction

Bottom Line: PDE5 inhibitors increase the proportion of successful sexual intercourse attempts to ~65% versus ~30% for placebo. For every 3 men given a PDE5 inhibitor compared to placebo, an additional 1 will have “improved erections”.

Read Tool

#239 – Need milk? Domperidone for increasing breast milk supply

Bottom Line: In mothers of pre-term infants, domperidone increases milk volume by ~90 ml more than placebo after 14 days, with an additional 1 in 5 women experiencing a 50% increase in milk supply. Doses above 30 mg/day are likely not needed and may increase the risk of arrhythmias. Optimal length of treatment unknown.

Read Tool
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  • 1

Gastroenterology

(2)

#247 – Fact or Fad: Intermittent fasting for sustained weight loss

Bottom Line: Although inconsistently defined, intermittent fasting (example 500 kcal/day for 2 days/week) and continuous dieting (~25% reduction in caloric intake daily) result in similar weight loss, usually ~5-9kg at 6 months-1 year. Discontinuation rates with both diets is up to ~60%.

Read Tool

#236 – It’s all in the details… or is it? Biosimilars versus biologics for inflammatory conditions

Bottom Line: For patients with rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory arthropathies, or inflammatory bowel disease, biosimilars and biologics have similar clinical outcomes and adverse events. Given the cost differences, starting patients with or switching to biosimilars should be encouraged.

Read Tool
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  • 1

General

(12)

#247 – Fact or Fad: Intermittent fasting for sustained weight loss

Bottom Line: Although inconsistently defined, intermittent fasting (example 500 kcal/day for 2 days/week) and continuous dieting (~25% reduction in caloric intake daily) result in similar weight loss, usually ~5-9kg at 6 months-1 year. Discontinuation rates with both diets is up to ~60%.

Read Tool

#246 – Just wait a minute: Point-of-care testing for Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis

Bottom Line: Point-of-care testing, including rapid antigen detection tests and newer nucleic acid detection tests for GABHS pharyngitis are useful for ruling in a diagnosis of GABHS when positive (specificity 95%-99%). Nucleic acid detection tests may be more sensitive than rapid antigen detection tests (92% versus 85%). While immediate testing and treatment may not always be required, populations at increased risk of GABHS complications, such as Canada’s Indigenous populations, are more likely to benefit.

Read Tool

#245 – Taking a hard look at the evidence: Phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors in erectile dysfunction

Bottom Line: PDE5 inhibitors increase the proportion of successful sexual intercourse attempts to ~65% versus ~30% for placebo. For every 3 men given a PDE5 inhibitor compared to placebo, an additional 1 will have “improved erections”.

Read Tool

#244 – Injecting Evidence into Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections

Bottom Line: The best quality evidence shows no difference in pain, function, or return to sport between platelet-rich plasma, dry needling, or saline for patients with Achilles tendinopathy, lateral epicondylitis, or rotator cuff tendinopathy.

Read Tool

#243 – Spread the Word: Widespread Distribution of Naloxone to Decrease Opioid-Related Deaths

Bottom Line: Offering naloxone kits and overdose related education for people who use opioids and their community may decrease opioid related deaths by ~7 per 100,000 population over one year. Effectiveness is likely influenced by magnitude of opioid problem in a given community and other confounders (like co-ingestions, co-morbidities, type and dose of opioid used).

Read Tool
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General Surgery

(1)

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool
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Geriatrics

(1)

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool
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Hematology

(2)

#242 – Putting the FUN in Fungi: Toenail onychomycosis treatments

Bottom Line: Up to 45-60% of patients on oral treatments (terbinafine best), 6-23% on topicals (efinaconazole best), and <10% on placebo will be “cured” after ~1 year. Topicals should be reserved for cases with minimal (≤20-40%) nail involvement.

Read Tool

#241 – “Who’s the fairest of them all?”: Topical treatments for rosacea

Bottom Line: For moderate-severe papulopustular rosacea, topical metronidazole, azelaic acid, and ivermectin have similar benefit with ~65-75% achieving patient reported improvement

Read Tool
  • Page
  • 1
  • of
  • 1

Infectious Disease

(1)

#246 – Just wait a minute: Point-of-care testing for Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis

Bottom Line: Point-of-care testing, including rapid antigen detection tests and newer nucleic acid detection tests for GABHS pharyngitis are useful for ruling in a diagnosis of GABHS when positive (specificity 95%-99%). Nucleic acid detection tests may be more sensitive than rapid antigen detection tests (92% versus 85%). While immediate testing and treatment may not always be required, populations at increased risk of GABHS complications, such as Canada’s Indigenous populations, are more likely to benefit.

Read Tool
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  • 1

Neurology

(1)

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool
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Obstetrics-Gynecology

(2)

#238 – In COPD puffers, does three-of-kind beat a pair?

Bottom Line: In COPD patients with ≥1 exacerbation per year, triple therapy reduces the risk of having ≥1 exacerbations/year compared to LAMA/LABA dual therapy (one less patient for every 36) but increases the risk of pneumonia (one more patient for every 34) and costs. It is possible that higher blood eosinophil counts (>150-300 cells/µL) may help target adding ICS.

Read Tool

#237 – Verifying the Value of Vaginal Estradiol Tablets

Bottom Line: Vaginal estradiol tablets are likely no better than placebo vaginal gel for reducing “most bothersome symptom scores” (mainly dyspareunia). However, compared to placebo vaginal tablets, they reduce symptoms (example: treatment “success” at 12 months in 86% versus 41% placebo). A non-medicated vaginal gel may be reasonable first-line for dyspareunia.

Read Tool
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  • 1

Orthopedics

(1)

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool
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  • 1

Pediatrics

(1)

#239 – Need milk? Domperidone for increasing breast milk supply

Bottom Line: In mothers of pre-term infants, domperidone increases milk volume by ~90 ml more than placebo after 14 days, with an additional 1 in 5 women experiencing a 50% increase in milk supply. Doses above 30 mg/day are likely not needed and may increase the risk of arrhythmias. Optimal length of treatment unknown.

Read Tool
  • Page
  • 1
  • of
  • 1

Psychiatry

(2)

#243 – Spread the Word: Widespread Distribution of Naloxone to Decrease Opioid-Related Deaths

Bottom Line: Offering naloxone kits and overdose related education for people who use opioids and their community may decrease opioid related deaths by ~7 per 100,000 population over one year. Effectiveness is likely influenced by magnitude of opioid problem in a given community and other confounders (like co-ingestions, co-morbidities, type and dose of opioid used).

Read Tool

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool
  • Page
  • 1
  • of
  • 1

Rheumatology

(3)

#244 – Injecting Evidence into Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections

Bottom Line: The best quality evidence shows no difference in pain, function, or return to sport between platelet-rich plasma, dry needling, or saline for patients with Achilles tendinopathy, lateral epicondylitis, or rotator cuff tendinopathy.

Read Tool

#240 – What is the Incidence of Iatrogenic Opioid Use Disorder?

Bottom Line: The incidence of OUD associated with prescribed opioids among chronic pain patients is likely ~3% (over ~2 years) but causation is uncertain. Patients with no history of substance use disorders appear to be at lower risk (<1%). Factors associated with increased risk of OUD include a history of substance use disorder and receiving opioids for longer duration (>90 days) or at higher doses (>120mg/day morphine equivalent).

Read Tool

#236 – It’s all in the details… or is it? Biosimilars versus biologics for inflammatory conditions

Bottom Line: For patients with rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory arthropathies, or inflammatory bowel disease, biosimilars and biologics have similar clinical outcomes and adverse events. Given the cost differences, starting patients with or switching to biosimilars should be encouraged.

Read Tool
  • Page
  • 1
  • of
  • 1

Urology

(3)

#245 – Taking a hard look at the evidence: Phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors in erectile dysfunction

Bottom Line: PDE5 inhibitors increase the proportion of successful sexual intercourse attempts to ~65% versus ~30% for placebo. For every 3 men given a PDE5 inhibitor compared to placebo, an additional 1 will have “improved erections”.

Read Tool

#238 – In COPD puffers, does three-of-kind beat a pair?

Bottom Line: In COPD patients with ≥1 exacerbation per year, triple therapy reduces the risk of having ≥1 exacerbations/year compared to LAMA/LABA dual therapy (one less patient for every 36) but increases the risk of pneumonia (one more patient for every 34) and costs. It is possible that higher blood eosinophil counts (>150-300 cells/µL) may help target adding ICS.

Read Tool

#237 – Verifying the Value of Vaginal Estradiol Tablets

Bottom Line: Vaginal estradiol tablets are likely no better than placebo vaginal gel for reducing “most bothersome symptom scores” (mainly dyspareunia). However, compared to placebo vaginal tablets, they reduce symptoms (example: treatment “success” at 12 months in 86% versus 41% placebo). A non-medicated vaginal gel may be reasonable first-line for dyspareunia.

Read Tool
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  • 1
  • of
  • 1